The Seeker

In between times …is NOW.

Mother’s Day: Then and Now

11 Comments

“Mother’s Day is a personal, family and memorial day. It’s a celebration for sons and daughters; a thank offering for the blessings of good homes.

Anna Jarvis“Make Mother’s Day a family day of reunions, messages to the absent and the spirit of good will to all. It is a constructive movement emphasising the home as the highest inspiration of our individual and national lives. Mother’s Day is a day of sentiment — not sentimentality; a day for everybody, but is well named Mother’s Day, for where better can sentiment start?,”

Jarvis told the Miami Daily News in a heated interview in 1924 to make a stand defending Mother’s Day against turning it into a “hallmark” occasion.

If you hate the commercialism of Mother’s Day, then you’re not alone — in fact, you have the ideal person in your corner.

Anna Jarvis, the founder of Mother’s Day, hated it too.

The American woman who single-handedly worked to make Mother’s Day a national holiday was reportedly so disgusted to hear that a department store was having a Mother’s Day sale that she threw her lunch on the floor. Jarvis then dedicated her life to disbanding the day she spent six years campaigning Congress for.

Jarvis’ original intention was that Mother’s Day would be a day to honor the sacrifices women made for their families.

And to add, a comment  from Mr. T.  of  SpeakListenPrayDon’tBeS …

Links:
Anna Jarvis ~ Founder of Mother’s Day
Image source

Author: seeker

I am a pilgrim on this earth.

11 thoughts on “Mother’s Day: Then and Now

  1. The card tradition is okay as long as there is sincerity attached to it.

  2. As usual, I made the card for my mother, as I have been doing since I was a tiny child. They aren’t complicated or elaborate, usually white paper with words such as I am blessed by your love and care, I thank God for giving me you as my mother and then some crayon drawings of flowers or birds or cats. I think she has everyone of them to this day.

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