Up Close and Personal


This gallery contains 1 photo.

What makes this photo great? Composition? Lighting? Creativity? Story? My take is ALL of the above. For one, the photographer is from Vancouver, Canada and this photo made the National Geographic YourShot Daily Dozen on June 26, 2015. To top … Continue reading

Wake Up!

Photographer: Wendy Erlendson, Canada

Photographer: Wendy Erlendson, Canada

How would you like to wake up with cold feet on your face such as a pet frog instead of your average pet of cat and dog?

“My daughter and her pet tree frog, “sticky fingers”, having some fun!”

This is one of the 14 photos selected for Not Your Average Pet National Geographic Your Shot assignment.

Wendy also won an International Photography Contest in 2008. What makes her win is she can bring  creativity and uniqueness to something quite ordinary according to the managing editor of NatGeo.

Nothing to sneeze about

Source: Forumzirve.net

Sneeze: God Bless You.    Source: Forumzirve.net

Why do we say Bless You when someone sneezes? It is habit or plain superstition.  I did a bit of research on about sneezing and it all stemmed from the great plague in 6th century.

National Geographic reports that during the plague of 590 AD, “Pope Gregory I ordered unceasing prayer for divine intercession. Part of his command was that anyone sneezing be blessed immediately (“God bless you”), since sneezing was often the first sign that someone was falling ill with the plague.”[7] By 750 AD, it became customary to say “God bless you” as a response to one sneezing.[8]

National Geographic : From Piazza San Pietro, proceed down the broad avenue across from the Basilica, Via della Conciliazione (commissioned by Mussolini to add grandeur to the site), to (4) Castel Sant’Angelo (Lungotevere Castello 50), a round-walled, battlemented structure that today serves as a museum. Commissioned as a mausoleum for Emperor Hadrian in the second century A.D., it was completed in 139 A.D after Hadrian had already died (his body was eventually entombed here). Within a hundred years the building was transformed into a fortress to help protect Rome from Germanic invaders. It got its current name in the sixth century—a time when a plague was devastating Rome—after Pope Gregory the Great had a vision of an angel hovering over the structure, sheathing its sword. The vision was interpreted as heralding the end of the plague, and a statue of Archangel Michael, the rescuing angel, was placed on top of the structure (the present bronze statue dates to 1752). In 1277 the fortress was connected to the Vatican Palace with a covered walkway and became a refuge of choice for successive Popes. It also harbored special prisoners, including the acclaimed goldsmith Benvenuto Cellini, who was accused (apparently falsely) of embezzling pontifical gems. Exhibits in the museum today include weaponry and artifacts related to the building’s long, colorful history.

Source: God Bless You: Wikipedia

Fireflies and Stars

Time Fireflies Photograph by Ionut Burloiu

Time Fireflies Photograph by Ionut Burloiu

Fireflies in the Garden

By Robert Frost 

Here come real stars to fill the upper skies,
And here on earth come emulating flies,
That though they never equal stars in size,
(And they were never really stars at heart)
Achieve at times a very star-like start.
Only, of course, they can’t sustain the part.


An allegory between the stars and the fireflies:
We may want to shoot for the stars and be like fireflies to shine like the stars but I say just be yourself, you will shine with your inner light.

Image credit to: Ionut Burloiu of Italy for having chosen as one of the best contributors of “After Midnight” Your Shot assignment at National Geographic.  Thank you Ionut for allowing me to share your photo of my memorable childhood.